What are the Pokemon Generations | Pokemon: Every Generation From Easiest To Hardest, Ranked

What are the pokemon generations? The fact of the matter is that Pokemon is simply not a challenging franchise. Time and time again, mainline entries prove that they’re more focused on getting each Trainer to the Elite Four as comfortably as possible instead of offering a real challenge.

Considering how much variety and customization Pokemon offers in regards to party composition, it’s a shame the difficulty curve is historically so low.

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But it wasn’t always like this. Although Pokemon has built a reputation for its easy difficulty, previous Generations actually made it a point to offer a serious challenge. While this isn’t the case for all the earlier Generations, Pokemon’s easier curve is a recent trend. Believe it or not, there once was a time Pokemon actually expected trainers to exert some effort.

Updated on February 20, 2023, by Ben Painter:With the release of Pokemon Scarlet & Violet gamers can explore the new and exciting world of Paldea, littered with new Pokemon, moves and challenges.

The new generation is Generation 9, which changed Pokemon into an RPG, players can do exactly what they want to do with three main storylines to focus on. Throughout the years of various Pokemon generations, the games have gotten easier, with EXP share, Pokemon boxes and Pokemon camps/picnics all being added to the game which makes leveling so much less of a challenge.

Older Pokemon fans will remember the challenge of defeating Whitney’s Miltank in Pokemon Gold & Silver, but nothing like this remains. For veteran players the games are a walk in the park and add rules such as Nuzlocke to make it more a task.

This update adds Generation 9 which for now only consists of Pokemon Scarlet & Violet in the position that best suits it from easiest to hardest.

Generation 9

Pokemon Scarlet & Violet is just not a challenge, especially for older players of the game. There are several reasons for this the game’s non-linear story, gamers can go to whether they want to in Paldea and train up their Pokemon before even completing a single gym.

Eating a ham sandwich will spawn Chansey’s in North Province (Area Three) which will grant the user an insane amount of EXP, virtually cheating as games before this didn’t have this method of spawning Chansey so easily.

Trainer battles are completely optional in Scarlet & Violet, long gone are the days of needing to battle every trainer in the way of the path. Gamers can simply hop on Koraidon or Miraidon and surge through the landscapes, the paths set out do not to be walked on which is where the majority of the trainers lie.

But even if gamers take on the trainers, once again the EXP share is present which allows every Pokemon in the party to receive points to level up, making the process so much easier.

The gyms, team star raids and titan Pokemon all offer somewhat of a challenge in the game, but the order is what the player chooses and chances are they may end up being over-leveled for the task. With each of the gyms and team star having their unique type this all just makes catering a team to each task so much easier.

The Elite Four has never been easy with Pokemon boxes readily available in the trainer’s bag, gamers can swap Pokemon in and out before every battle. The days of carefully crafting a team for each opponent are gone as gamers can make a team for each member and swap it in prior to the battle.

This is also the case of the Champion of Paldea, Greeta whose team doesn’t look like much on paper, comparing this to the well-crafted teams of Cynthia and Blue of generations past this one is a walk in the park. Greeta has three Pokemon that are weak to fighting type (one quad weak) and two Psychic type Pokemon also which can be taken down by solid Ghost, Bug or Dark type.

The new Ghost/Fighting Annihlape will have a field day when it comes to taking on Greeta. Her original team starts at level 61, which is considerably lower leveled in comparison to some other trainers. Greeta’s team a second team round is harder but still should be no match for trainers at that point in the game:

Espathra – Lv.69 (Oppurtinist) Psychic

  • Lumina Crash
  • Dazzling Gleam
  • Quick Attack
  • Reflect

Gogoat – Lv.69 (Sap Sipper) Grass

  • Horn Leech
  • Zen Headbutt
  • Play Rough
  • Bulk Up

Veluza – Lv.69 (Mold Breaker) Water/Psychic

  • Aqua Jet
  • Liquidation
  • Psycho Cut
  • Ice Fang

Avalugg – Lv.69 (Own Tempo) Ice

  • Avalanch
  • Cruch
  • Earthquake
  • Body Press

Kingambit – Lv.69 (Supreme Overlord) Dark/Steel

  • Iron Head
  • Kowtow Cleave
  • Zen Headbutt
  • Stone Edge

Gimmora – Lv.70 (Toxic Debris) Rock/Poison (Rock Tera Type)

  • Tera Blast
  • Sudge Wave
  • Earth Power
  • Dazzling Gleam
  • what are the pokemon generations

Generation 8

Generation 8 really should have been a turning point for the franchise. After years of structural stagnation, Sword & Shield was positioned as the games to finally transition Pokemon from 2D to 3D. It didn’t take long for the new generation to garner controversy, in large part due to Galar serving as the first region to actually exclude Pokemon from the final Pokédex.

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If nothing else, these exclusions could have been an opportunity for GameFreak to refine the series’ dwindling dungeon decision and enemy balancing. Tragically, any attempts at in-game balancing are immediately offset by the aggressive Exp. Share system which more or less ensure a trainer’s entire party is perpetually over leveled.

Even intentionally holding one’s team back, the Generation 8 games are pitifully easy. Gameplay borders on braindead, requiring next to no critical throughout from the player. Any depth combat can have will exclusively come from multiplayer.

Despite being essentially void of all challenge, the Gen 8 games still have some high-powered trainers who can be fun to battle. Mustard, the owner of the Isle of Armor’s Master Dojo, is a seasoned veteran who has not only traveled the world but has also been the Champion of the Galar region in his youth as well as a Fighting-type Gym Leader.

The player can battle him multiple times, however, his true power can only be experienced in one’s third encounter with him at his dojo. Here is Mustard’s team during his most powerful appearance after the Galarian Star Tournament:

Mienshao – Lv.78 (Inner Focus) Fighting

  • Fake Out
  • Close Combat
  • Blaze Kick
  • U-turn

Luxray – Lv.78 (Intimidate) Electric

  • Wild Charge
  • Crunch
  • Psychic Fangs
  • Play Rough

Corviknight – Lv.79 (Unnerve) Flying/Steel

  • Iron Head
  • Brave Bird
  • Light Screen
  • Body Press

Lycanroc (Midday Form) – Lv.80 (Keen Eye) Rock

  • Stone Edge
  • Accelerock
  • Stealth Rock
  • Play Rough

Kommo-o – Lv.80 (Soundproof) Dragon/Fighting

  • Clanging Scales
  • Flash Cannon
  • Clangorous Soul
  • Aura Sphere

Urshifu – Lv.80 (Unseen Fist) Fighting/Dark or Fighting/Water (The opposite to the players choice)

  • Surging Strikes/Wicked Blow
  • Close Combat
  • Iron Head
  • Poison Jab

Generation 6

Pokemon X & Y were something of a big deal for the franchise. Although Generation 5 was compiled of some very well-designed RPGs, the Generation didn’t really push the series forward. Generation 6 takes a lot of steps forward for the series: deeper player customization, a 3D world (albeit still in the spirit of 2D Pokemon,) and a dedication to online helped X & Y shine.

That said, Generation 6 was not without its problems, taking steps back for the series. Notably, the difficulty curve was at its absolute lowest. Before Sword & Shieldreleased, X & Y were the easiest Pokemon games by a wide margin.

Despite being remakes of one of the harder Generations. Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire, unfortunately, didn’t fare much better, either.

The champion of the Kalos region, Diantha, is at the top of this trainer food chain, and her team is one of the few that can possibly give some trainers pause in battle.

She has an Aurorus that is capable of setting up Light Screen and Reflect, which can make her team a bit tougher to knock out. Her Hawlucha will also buff itself with Sword Attack, so take it down quickly and don’t let her Mega Gardevoir stick around too long, either. Here is Diantha’s team in detail:

Hawlucha – Lv.64 (Limber) Fighting/Flying

  • Sword Dance
  • Poison Jab
  • Flying Press
  • X-Scissor

Tyrantrum – Lv.65 (Strong Jaw) Rock/Dragon

  • Head Smash
  • Crunch
  • Dragon Claw
  • Earthquake

Aurorus – Lv.65 (Refrigerate) Rock/Ice

  • Thunder
  • Blizzard
  • Light Screen
  • Reflect

Gourgeist – Lv.65 (Pickup) Ghost/Grass

  • Trick-or-Treat
  • Phantom Force
  • Seed Bomb
  • Shadow Sneak

Goodra – Lv.66 (Sap Sipper) Dragon

  • Dragon Pulse
  • Muddy Water
  • Fire Blast
  • Focus Blast

Gardevoir [Mega] – Lv.68 (Trace [Pixilate]) Psychic/Fairy

  • Moonblast
  • Shadow Ball
  • Psychic
  • Thunderbolt

Generation 7

Pokemon Sun & Moon were letdowns for many, attempting to reinvent a formula that had been growing stale on a mostly superficial level. Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon were likewise disappointments, arguably the worst third versions in the entire franchise. While Generation 7 isn’t as easy as Generation 6, it is still painfully easy.

Beginning with Generation 6, Pokemon simply stopped caring about offering any semblance of challenge. This could perhaps be excused in X & Y as the games were explicitly meant to be reintroductions to the franchise, but this ignores how Generation 1 wasn’t easy and the fact that Generation 7 doubles-down on all of Generation 6’s bad habits.

The leading Pokemon expert of the region, Professor Kukui, is arguably the toughest trainer on the Alola islands. In the player’s champion defense battle against him (Ultra Sun &Ultra Moon), he will come packing some of the highest-level NPC Pokemon in this Generation with most possessing somewhat viable movesets, like his his tricky Magnezone with Mirror

Coat that can catch players off guard and his Braviary that is capable of buffing his team’s Speed as well as forcing out the player’s Pokemon with a status move.

His 6th team slot will also depend on which starter the player chose, with the Prof having the final evolution of the line most type-effective against the player’s choice. Here is Professor Kukui’s strongest team:

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Lycanroc (Midday Form) – Lv.69 (Keen Eye) Rock

  • Stone Edge
  • Accelerock
  • Crunch
  • Stealth Rock

Alolan Ninetales – Lv.68 (Snow Cloak) Ice/Fairy

  • Dazzling Gleam
  • Blizzard
  • Ice Shard
  • Safeguard

Braviary – Lv.68 (Keen Eye) Normal/Flying

  • Crush Claw
  • Brave Bird
  • Tailwind
  • Whirlwind

Magnezone – Lv.68 (Sturdy) Electric/Steel

  • Thunderbolt
  • Thunder Wave
  • Flash Cannon
  • Mirror Coat

Snorlax – Lv.68 (Thick Fat) Normal

  • Body Slam
  • Crunch
  • Heavy Slam
  • High Horsepower

[If Player Chose Rowlet] Incineroar – Lv.68 (Blaze) Fire/Dark

  • Flare Blitz
  • Darkest Lariat
  • Outrage
  • Cross Chop

[If Player Chose Litten] Primarina – Lv.68 (Torrent) Water/Fairy

  • Sparkling Aria
  • Aqua Jet
  • Hyper Voice
  • Moonblast

[If Player Chose Popplio] Decidueye – Lv.68 (Overgrow) Grass/Ghost

  • Leaf Blade
  • Spirit Shackle
  • Sucker Punch
  • Brave Bird

Generation 2

Pokemon Gold & Silver deserve a lot of credit for not only expanding upon the franchise mechanically but offering more content on a scale reserved for only the grandest sequels. Generation 2 is a more accessible, more compelling adventure that takes Trainers across two regions in an epic that could have comfortably ended the series on a high.

It’s not unusual to see Generation 2’s praises sung high, but even at release Gold & Silver had serious problems. Most notably, the difficulty curve.

Generation 2 is so much easier than Generation 1, it’s jarring. The main game never requires the player to have a team any stronger than their 50s. If nothing else, there are a few choke points that recognize the lower curve as a means to combat it (Whitney, Silver’s fights, Lance, Red.)

Though, at the top of these moderate challenges is the legendary trainer Red, the former Kanto Champion (and protagonist from the Gen 1 games) who now lives and a hermit in Silver Cave, honing their might with their over-leveled team.

Despite the Gen 2 games not being, particularly hard, Red’s team stands out for having actual strategies that can potentially be dangerous, depending on the order in which he sends out his Pokemon.

For example, if his Venusaur with Sunny Day is sent out before his Charizard, the player may have to deal with exceptionally powerful Fire-type attacks.

He also has a Pikachu at a higher level than almost any other NPC Pokemon in the entire franchise and a Snorlax that simply refuses to go down, both of which should not be underestimated. Here is Red’s team when one finds him in Silver Cave:

Espeon – Lv.73 Psychic

  • Mud Slap
  • Swift
  • Reflect
  • Psychic

Snorlax – Lv.75 Normal

  • Amnesia
  • Rest
  • Snore
  • Body Slam

Venusaur – Lv.77 Grass/Poison

  • Sunny Day
  • Solarbeam
  • Giga Drain
  • Synthesis

Charizard – Lv.77 Fire/Flying

  • Flamethrower
  • Wing Attack
  • Slash
  • Fire Spin

Blastoise – Lv.77 Water

  • Rain Dance
  • Surf
  • Blizzard
  • Whirlpool

Pikachu – Lv.81 Electric

  • Charm
  • Quick Attack
  • Thunderbolt
  • Thunder

Generation 1

Generation 1 may be lacking in the modern quality of life fixtures, but on a pure design level, it features some of the franchise’s best dungeons and enemy party composition.

There are always plenty of trainers to fight, wearing down even over-leveled Pokemon. The higher encounter rate plays into this as well, but Generation 1 knows how to approach difficulty.

This is best conveyed through the starters: Bulbasaur offers the easiest main game playthrough, Squirtle offers a decent challenge, and Charmander has a rough start akin to a hard mode.

The curve balances itself out around the third Gym, but Generation 1 can be a decent challenge from start to finish. The Elite Four in particular can be a real wake-up call for any trainers relying primarily on their starter. Blue is one of the most formidable Champions in the series.

Although Blue’s team is different in PokemonYellow than it was in Red & Blue, many consider the latter team compositions to be tougher, particularly the Kanto Champion’s Alakazam, which is the strongest Psychic Pokemon found in the game until one meets Mewtwo in Cerulean Cave.

Players should also be wary of his Rhydon that knows one of the rare One-Hit-KO moves. It should also be mentioned that his team changes a bit depending on the starter the player chose as he will have one of the starter final evolutions as well as a rotation of Gyarados, Exeggutor, or Arcanine depending on what coverage his team needs to support his starter. Here is Blue’s team during the Red & Blue champion battle:

Pidgeot – Lv.61 Normal/Flying

  • Wing Attack
  • Sky Attack
  • Mirror Move
  • Whirlwind

Alakazam – Lv.59 Psychic

  • Psybeam
  • Psychic
  • Reflect
  • Recover

Rhydon – Lv.61 Ground/Rock

  • Leer
  • Tail Whip
  • Fury Attack
  • Horn Drill

[Appears If Blue Does Not have Blastoise] Gyarados – Lv.61 Water/Flying

  • Dragon Rage
  • Hydro Pump
  • Hyper Beam
  • Leer

[Appears If Blue Does Not have Charizard] Arcanine – Lv.63 Fire

  • Ember
  • Leer
  • Roar
  • Take Down

[Appears If Blue Does Not have Venusaur] Exeggutor – Lv.63 Grass/Psychic

  • Hypnosis
  • Barrage
  • Stomp
  • Leech Seed

[If Player Chose Bulbasaur] Charizard – Lv.65 Fire/Flying

  • Fire Blast
  • Rage
  • Slash
  • Fire Spin

[If Player Chose Charmander] Blastoise – Lv.65 Water

  • Hydro Pump
  • Blizzard
  • Bite
  • Withdraw

[If Player Chose Squirtle] Venusaur – Lv.65 Grass/Poison

  • Growth
  • Mega Drain
  • Razor Leaf
  • Solarbeam

what are the pokemon generations

Generation 3

Ruby & Sapphire are far from the hardest games in the series, but the rest of Generation 3 does a really good job at offering a difficulty curve that’s accessible to newcomers while gripping for veterans.

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FireRed and LeafGreen are remakes of Generation 1, and generally do a great job at upping the difficulty by just a bit. With Gen 3’s new mechanics, the remakes become the definitive way to experience Kanto

Emeraldrebalances Ruby & Sapphire by a fair bit, making the main game tougher in the process. Wallace is a weaker Champion than Steven was, but Steven does return as one of the series’ more challenging post-game bosses.

More importantly, Emerald introduces the Battle Frontier, and its first depiction is fairly difficult. Succeeding at the Battle Frontier requires a level of strategy the main games rarely ever need.

In this manner, Steven Stone echos the way Red went off into the depths of a dank cave for the solitude and space required to become a truly powerful trainer.

Because of his training in Meteor Falls, where the player can find him after beating the Hoenn Elite Four and Champion, he has become the most powerful trainer in the region. His team boasts high levels and some decent movesets, though they are notably resilient due to being all Steel, Rock, and Ground types. Here is Steven’s team when encountered in Meteor Falls:

Skarmory – Lv.77 (Keen Eye) Steel/Flying

  • Toxic
  • Aerial Ace
  • Steel Wing
  • Spikes

Claydol – Lv.75 (Levitate) Ground/Psychic

  • Reflect
  • Ancientpower
  • Light Screen
  • Earthquake

Aggron – Lv.76 (Sturdy) Steel/Rock

  • Thunder
  • Solarbeam
  • Dragon Claw
  • Earthquake

Armaldo – Lv.76 (Battle Armor) Rock/Bug

  • Water Pulse
  • Aerial Ace
  • Ancientpower
  • Slash

Cradily – Lv.76 (Suction Cups) Rock/Grass

  • Giga Drain
  • Ingrain
  • Ancientpower
  • Confuse Ray

Metagross – Lv.78 (Clear Body) Steel/Psychic

  • Earthquake
  • Shadow Ball
  • Psychic
  • Meteor Mash

Generation 4

Generation 4 isn’t that much harder than Generation 3– and certainly not when it comes to the Battle Frontier– but Platinum is much harder than Emerald was and HeartGold and Soul Silver do an incredible job at remaking Generation II, ironing out Johto’s imbalanced difficulty curve.

Not only is Sinnoh one of the tougher regions in general, but Platinum alsobeefs up the storyline to include even more boss fights– many of which are actually a challenge.

Cyrus was by no means a pushover in Diamond & Pearl, but he puts up a much better fight in Platinum. More notably, Cynthia might very well be the single strongest Champion in the series.

As for HeartGold and SoulSilver, it’s just nice to be able to play through a version of Johto that requires consistent thought. Johto itself is still on the easier side, but Kanto has been rebalanced and the post-game is harder on a whole.

The Sinnoh Champion Cynthia’s team (after the Stark Mountain event) is definitely the most dangerous team in the Generation for possessing such a variety of powerful strategies that no player can fully prepare for the fight with her unless they know what’s coming. Here is Cynthia’s team after Stark Mountain:

Spiritomb – Lv.74 (Pressure) Ghost/Dark

  • Dark Pulse
  • Psychic
  • Silver Wind
  • Ominous Wind
  • Roserade – Lv.74 (Natural Cure) Grass/Poison
  • Energy Ball
  • Shadow Ball
  • Sludge Bomb
  • Extrasensory

Lucario – Lv.76 (Steadfast) Fighting/Steel

  • Aura Sphere
  • Dragon Pulse
  • Psychic
  • Earthquake

Togekiss – Lv.76 (Hustle) Normal/Flying

  • Air Slash
  • Aura Sphere
  • Water Pulse
  • Psychic

Milotic – Lv.74 (Marvel Scale) Water

  • Surf
  • Ice BeamMirror Coat
  • Aqua Ring

Garchomp – Lv.78 (Sand Veil) Dragon/Ground

  • Dragon Rush
  • Earthquake
  • Brick Break
  • Giga Impact

Generation 5

When looking at Pokemon as just another series of RPGs, Generation 5 is the best of the bunch. Great storytelling, good party variety, and by far the best difficulty curve in the series.

On their own, Black/White and Black 2/White 2 offer a healthy challenge, but Generation 5 actually features easy and hard modes.

Challenge Mode in Black 2/White 2might very well be the best Pokemon experience there is. All trainers have higher leveled Pokemon, and Gym Leaders and the Elite Four all have extra Pokemon.

It’s a shame the franchise went from offering Challenge Mode in Generation 5 to plummeting the difficulty in Generation 4.

Although the NPC is considered the strongest in this Generation, the green-haired trainer known as N, is more known for his close ties with either Reshiram or Zekrom (depending on the version), its this trainer’s Season Battle teams that stand out as the strongest, for in each season he has a different themed team that takes advantage of the immensely powerful weather mechanics.

His Spring appearance brings a rain-based team that is something that would be viable in competitive game play against other real people. Here is N’s supremely strong Spring Battle team:

Politoed – Lv.77 (Drizzle) Water

  • Hydro Pump
  • Focus Blast
  • Hypnosis
  • Psychic

Lanturn – Lv.75 (Volt Absorb) Water/Electric

  • Thunder
  • Signal Beam
  • Hydro Pump
  • Stockpile

Tentacruel – Lv.75 (Clear Body) Water/Poison

  • Rain Dance
  • Scald
  • Giga Drain
  • Barrier

Kabutops – Lv.75 (Swift Swim) Rock/Water

  • Stone Edge
  • Aqua Jet
  • X-Scissor
  • Low Kick

Omastar – Lv.75 (Swift Swim) Rock/Water

  • Rain Dance
  • Ice Beam
  • Hydro Pump
  • Earth Power

Starmie – Lv.75 (Natural Cure) Water/Psychic

  • Hydro Pump
  • Psychic
  • Ice Beam
  • Thunder

Above is information about what are the pokemon generations that we have compiled. Hopefully, through the above content, you have a more detailed understanding of what are the pokemon generations Thank you for reading our posst.

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